8 Questions To Ask Before Testing Your Indoor Air

1[1]According to the EPA, 96% of living spaces have at least one indoor air quality problem. Mold can have a negative impact on indoor air, however both the EPA and the CDC caution that when mold is a concern testing or sampling is unnecessary – mold should just be removed.  However, sometimes it is hard to know what is affecting your indoor air quality.  Before you pay for testing, which can be time consuming and expensive, here are a few questions you can ask yourself to determine if indoor air quality testing is necessary.

Exposure to mold is an allergen for many people.  If mold is not removed it, may cause various health issues.   Individuals react differently to elevated levels of mold spores.  Molds also produce mycotoxins (toxic chemicals) and when mold is not taken care of properly can cause the toxic chemicals to become airborne and breathed in by occupants.

According to the EPA, if you see mold, it is mold.  You do not need to test to see what type of mold it is – just remove it.  Mold on attic ceilings or bathroom walls can negatively affect the building material over time therefore it is better to locate what is causing the mold, remove the mold, and fix the source.

According to the EPA, if you see mold, it is mold.  You do not need to test to see what type of mold it is – just remove it.  Mold on attic ceilings or bathroom walls can negatively affect the building material over time therefore it is better to locate what is causing the mold, remove the mold, and fix the source.

Water events are the main cause of mold issues and mold can grow as quickly as 24 hours.

Air movers can blow mold spores throughout the environment and cause mycotoxins to be released into the air which can further decrease the quality of the air.

Mold remediation, if not done correctly can exacerbate air quality issues.  Testing to ensure the levels are normal can help ensure the living space is safe to occupy.    A common example is if you are purchasing a home, it may be a good idea to have testing done before you occupy the space.

Testing can help with ruling out cause of illness for landlord and tenant disputes. 

If you are concerned about mold, allergens, improper ventilation, and the health of building occupants take proactive steps to have the indoor air tested professionally.

2[1]If you answered yes to any of these questions then you may want to test your indoor air.  The next step is to determine which testing method to utilize or if a professional company is your best option. 

Stay tuned for Part 2 of our Indoor Air Quality Testing Series (this month) where we take a deep dive into the pros and cons of commonly used indoor air quality testing methods.   

CIE | Author – Lynette Schmidt, Business Development Manager | November 2, 2020

Need your indoor air tested?

Please give Certified Indoor Environmental a call.  We  can provide a detailed IAQ report that lists findings and recommendations as well as an individualized and affordable plan for remediating the problem.  We also have over 800 5-star reviews. 

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Certified Indoor Environmental is licensed, bonded and insured. We apply advanced technology and use state-of-the-art equipment to handle air testing and mold remediation for residential and commercial customers. We also support realtors, home inspectors, property managers, and anyone who needs the air quality of their property tested.  Our technicians are certified and trained by the IICRC (Institute of Inspection Cleaning, and Restoration Certification), the organization recognized for setting the highest standards for the cleaning and restoration industry.  Learn more about our process here.

 

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One Reply to “8 Questions To Ask Before Testing Your Indoor Air”

  • Way cool! Some extremely valid points! I appreciate you writing this post plus the rest of the site is really good. Evvy Dannel Soinski

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